11

Migratory Species

5.4 17

A United Nations report warns that nearly half of the world's migratory species are in decline, with one in five facing extinction. The report highlights the urgent need for global action to protect these species from man-made threats.

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A new report from the United Nations warns that one in five migratory species is at risk of extinction. The report, which is the most comprehensive assessment of migratory species to date, reveals that nearly half of the world's migratory species are in decline. [Raw Story] [CBS News] [The Globe and Mail] [The Jerusalem Post] [The Boston Globe] [France24] [News.com.au] [My Northwest] [San Diego Union-Tribune] [New Scientist] [The Guardian]

The report highlights the threats faced by a wide range of migratory species, including birds, mammals, fish, and insects. These species travel across international borders in search of food, breeding sites, and better habitats. However, factors such as habitat loss, climate change, pollution, and overexploitation have put them at risk. [Raw Story] [CBS News] [The Globe and Mail] [The Jerusalem Post] [The Boston Globe] [France24] [News.com.au] [My Northwest] [San Diego Union-Tribune] [New Scientist] [The Guardian]

Some of the key findings of the report include:

- 37% of freshwater migratory fish species are threatened with extinction, primarily due to the construction of dams and barriers that block their migration routes. [The Globe and Mail] [The Boston Globe] [New Scientist]

- Leatherback turtles, which have the longest migration of any reptile, are at high risk of extinction due to threats such as accidental capture in fishing gear, pollution, and climate change. [Raw Story] [CBS News] [The Guardian]

- Fruit bats, which play a crucial role in pollination and seed dispersal, are under threat from habitat loss, hunting, and conflicts with humans. [The Globe and Mail] [News.com.au] [The Guardian]

- Monarch butterflies, known for their long-distance migration between North America and Mexico, are declining due to habitat loss, pesticide use, and climate change. [Raw Story] [The Guardian]

The report emphasizes the need for international collaboration and coordinated efforts to protect migratory species. It calls for measures such as creating protected areas, reducing pollution, and improving the management of fisheries and hunting practices. The report also stresses the importance of addressing the underlying causes of species decline, including unsustainable agriculture, urbanization, and climate change. [Raw Story] [The Globe and Mail] [The Jerusalem Post] [The Boston Globe] [France24] [News.com.au] [San Diego

Current Stats

Data

Virality Score 5.4
Change in Rank NEW
Thread Age 10 days
Number of Articles 17

Political Leaning

Left 25.0%
Center 75.0%
Right 0.0%

Regional Coverage

US 50.0%
Non-US 50.0%